Posts Tagged ‘Brian Jonestown Massacre’

features, music

10 reasons why The Rolling Stones are better than The Beatles

By Stefano on May 2nd, 2013

1 They have the coolest member of both bands

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Brian Jones or Ringo? There’s no contest there.

2 The Stones had an edgy dark side.

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The Beatles would never have released an album called Their Satanic Majesties would they? The Beatles dabbled with the counter culture in the 60s. The Stones were the counter culture

3 The Beatles gave up at the end of the 60s.

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Lightweights. The Stones made some of their best albums in the 70s and beyond.

4 The Beatles gave up touring. The Stones are the greatest live act the world have ever known

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So a few screaming girls stopped The Beatles from touring. Have you seen the violence at the early Stones gigs? Yet they went on to become the best live band ever.

5 The Stones were much better musicians.

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Keith is the Human Riff, Charlie Watts is an amazing drummer, Brian Jones could play anything with strings. The Beatles were great songwriters, but only average musicians.

6 The bands that followed The Stones were cool.

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In the wake of The Stones we got the dirty punk R&B of The Pretty Things. The Beatles gifted us Gerry and The Pacemakers and Cilla Black!

7 Gimme Shelter has the best intro to a pop song ever.

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Though Paint It Black runs it close

8 The Beatles’ solo stuff is mostly pretty poor.

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Ok I’ll give you Imagine and Ram, but there’s also Double Fantasy and this gem. The Stones (oh, apart from Bill) never bothered too much with indulgent solo stuff.

9 Who would you rather go and see today. The Stones or Macca?

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Well if the Olympics is anything to go by the Scouse fella can’t really sing any more.

10 Without The Stones there would be no Brian Jonestown Massacre, the best psych band of the last two decades.

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And the world would be a much poorer place



features, Gallery, music

Not just My Bloody Valentine – Eight original Shoegazing bands who need reviving

By Stefano on February 5th, 2013

mbvLike most music obsessives from time to time I have wondered what it must have been like to be there at a pivotal moment in music history. You know, like avoiding the sweat dripping off the ceiling while the Fab Four hone their post-Hamburg rock and roll in The Cavern. Or watching the light show and Syd Barrett in psychedelic melt down mode at the UFO. Or even hanging with the art school punks at CBGBs as they watched as Blondie’s pop moves took New York’s indie screen global.

The nearest I ever got to a seismic pop moment was in a small and sweaty basement room bizarrely sited on Oxford Street by Tottenham Court Road tube. For there in 1991, the club, known as the Syndrome, became the meeting place for the main movers of the London wing of British indie, some of whom would go on to create some incredible music.

Energised by both the danceable grooves coming out of Manchester and the visceral punky thrills of grunge jetting in from America’s North West coast, the likes of Blur, Ride, Lush, Moose and many others began to fashion a musical response that kept the energy of punk but , how shall we put this, was a little more cerebral. And the music these middle class punks played (for many of the bands were from the posher parts of London and the South East) became known as shoegazing (after some of the musician’s habits of looking at their feet while messing with effects pedals).

As well as absorbing the primitive, yet arty sounds of bands like Dinosaur Junior and Sonic Youth, the Shoegazers were almost all highly influenced by the feedback drenched howl of My Bloody Valentine. Many bands also kept the melodic obsession of the C86 bands in creating sweet, often catchy tunes that they buried under howls of effects and white noise.

Shoegazing, just like The Syndrome, didn’t last too long, but for a couple of the bands it was a springboard to better things. Sadly though most of them didn’t see the musical tidal wave of Brit Pop coming and the music press quickly lost interest in shy, retiring musicians from Surrey and turned their attention to boisterous Beatles-obsessed northerners. In fact almost all of them were history by the mid -90. Except that is in the US where a couple of bands from a city on the nation’s West coast kept the genre alive.

So with My Bloody Valentine releasing their first album in twenty or so years there is no better time to go back and revisit some of the less well known protagonists of the Shoegazing (a term which not surprisingly almost all the bands associated with it hated) era. There are profiles of eight bands and you can hear them, along with some fellow travellers in the Spotify playlist.

* The most under rated 80s indie bands here

* Under rated British 90s indie bands

The Brian Jonestown Massacre

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Picture 7 of 8

By the mid-90s no one was making shoegazing style music anywhere in the world, except for one man - Anton Newcombe. In what was to prove to be one of the most inspired moves of recent times Newcombe took the jangly 60s psych that he had been experimenting with his group Acid on track likes Thoughts of You, layered in guitar effects and added Kraut Rock grooves. The result was the incendiary Methodrone, possibly the best shoegazing record that the US has ever delivered. Evergreen and especially That Girl Suicide, rank among the best moments not just of shoegazing but of 90s indie. It is also worth checking out the compilation Tepid Peppermint Wonderland from that period including Hide And Seek and Anemone. The band of course went on to make a series of classic albums and last year’s Aufheben showed they could still trip with the best of them.



features, music

The Unmissables – the top 15 Psychedelic albums of 2012 – Tame Impala, Mmoss, Alfa 9 and more

By Stefano on December 3rd, 2012

Here at Brandish Towers we are huge psych fans. From the bonkers nursery rhymes on acid tunes of early Floyd through to the dream pop melange that is The Horrors we can’t get enough of it.

Here then are our favourite Psychedelic albums of 2012. It does of course  beg the question what exactly is Psychedelia?

Literally it is mind expanding music which over time has come to be associated with bands in thrall to its golden age of the late 60s.

These days it has become more of a catch all term though for bands who take mind expanding music from the past (Kraut Rock, Shoegazing, Dream pop and even a bit of prog) and give it a contemporary spin.

This year has all been about the huge success of Tame Impala. They are, however, the tip of a very large iceberg. Labels like Trouble In Mind in the US and Ample Play in the UK as well mags like Shindig and blogs like The Active Listener show just how exciting and diverse the psych scene currently is.

Here then are our favourite  15. What have we missed? Tell us in the comments. Spotify playlist below too.

Here our are top debut albums and singer-songwriter albums too.

15 Sky Picnic - Paint Me A Dream

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Picture 1 of 15

The second album from Brooklyn's biggest Floyd fans, Paint Me A Dream is a wonderfully trippy listen that incorporates elements of psych, early prog and kraut rock. The stand out track, Rippled also has a whiff of The Church's epic Priest=Aura opus, while Translucent Lucy is prime Brit 60s psych pop. Only available via bandcamp (and on vinyl too) at the moment.

 




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