Posts Tagged ‘men’s fashion’

News

Lacoste bought up by Swiss Maus Freres Group

By Gerald Lynch on October 29th, 2012

 

Sportswear brand Lacoste have been bought out by the Maus Freres Group. The Swiss investors already held a 35% stake in the brand, and are now majority holders by buying up an additional 30.3% stake. The move values the French fashion line at somewhere between  1.0 billion and 1.25 billion euros ($1.29-$1.62 billion).

The sale comes courtesy of a group of family shareholders, including former chairman and chief executive Michael Lacoste, son of brand-founder Rene Lacoste. This has once again ignited growing speculation that a family rift over the direction of the brand is causing tension.

It is believed that Michael Lacoste is at loggerheads with his own daughter, Sophie Lacoste-Dournel, with the parent opposing his daughter’s ascension to the position of non-executive chairman in September.

Michael Lacoste claims that Maus, who have three voting members on the company board, had convinced part of the Lacoste family to form an alliance, wrestling control of the brand away from him.

Maus Freres Group owns department stores and home-improvement outlets in their native land of Switzerland and are a large distributor of clothing brands. The group claim that the purchase secures the future of the brand for the foreseeable future, ensuring employees retain their jobs during tough economic times.



Gallery, Suits & Tailoring

Frencheye reveal Men’s Autumn/Winter 2012 tailoring collection

By Gerald Lynch on August 21st, 2012

Frencheye Men's AW12

Picture 3 of 11
Picture 3 of 11

We’ve just experienced our allotted two days of British summer (barely enough time to shake the cobwebs off our deck shoes and shorts!), and so it’s now time to turn our attention to the Autumn Winter trends for 2012.

Frencheye, a London-based tailoring brand who take their inspiration from continental brands like Zegna and Canali, are touting their latest range of evening wear.

“From desk to dinner” is the Frencheye tagline, and the range certainly has the flexibility to impress both in the boardroom and on a classy night out. We’re particularly keen on the use of velvets and moleskins, though it takes a brave bloke to “tip the velvet”, so to speak.

Click here for more info, and click through above for some choice picks from the range.



News, Sportswear

SUMMER STYLE: The Kooples Sport Polo Shirts

By Gerald Lynch on April 18th, 2012

Sure, so we’re still in the doldrums of April showers, but the summer sunshine is surely just around the corner now, so it’s time to whack out your pasty forearms and dive into some short sleeve tops.

Comfy yet flexible enough to work in both formal and casual occasions, men’s staple the polo shirt is a must-have in any wardrobe. Leading the charge in the cut this summer are French brand The Kooples, whose new Sport range has a superb selection of polo shirts in all manner of styles and shades to suit practically all tastes.

From primary colours to pastels, short sleeves to long, ribbed colours to embroidered trims, The Kooples have probably the best range of polos from any brand this year we’ve seen so far, and are doing well to push their wares.

Indeed, their pumping plenty of cash into the marketing campaign for the range, enlisting ex-Manchester United madman and sometime-actor Eric Cantona and his wife Rachida (pictured top). As pretty much the most recognisable French sports personality on UK shores (aside perhaps from Thierry Henry and his va-va-voom) they’ve got the campaign pitched pretty much spot on in our opinion.

If we were to pick one stand-out item, we’d go for the red “Very light cotton pique polo” with white colour. We can see Cantona knocking a few past Peter Schmeichel on the training ground wearing that one!

Prices start at £80 and go up to £120 for long-sleeved polos.

Click here for more info.



Accessories, Polls

POLL: Men’s braces – Yay or Nay?

By Gerald Lynch on April 3rd, 2012

I like a good belt, me. From a thin braided offering to a chunky biker buckle, they’re my proffered gravity-defying trouser accessory. But as the years pile up, and the pounds pile on, my paunch is finding itself more and more at odds with my waistline adornments.

So what are my other options? I’d rather walk about in my underpants than wear elasticated trousers. They make me think of the super-sized people who have to hire a golf-cart  to get around Disney World without keeling over. And losing weight just isn’t going to happen when Subway have just launched a £3 lunch time meal deal.

As an upstanding citizen (and one happy not to get an ASBO for flashing my tighty whities) the job falls to braces (or suspenders if you’re a US reader), the shoulder-strapping saviours of trouser hems since being popularised in 1822 by Albert Thurston.

But they’ve had a bit of a chequered history, have the humble old braces.  While they’re currently on the rise thanks to the popularity of the suited-booted Mad Men look, in the UK at least they’re still closely associated with the skinhead style championed by the National Front right-wing movement of the 1980s.

Also, this image of former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, caught recently taking out the rubbish wearing little else OTHER THAN BRACES makes a little bit of sick rise to the back of my throat. Sorry Ken, I’d pick you over Boris any day of the week, but this look’s more Albert Steptoe than Albert Camus.

So, have braces weathered the unsavoury associated storm of the Eighties to shine through in 2012 as an on-trend “boardroom-chic” accessory? Or are they still just a way of keeping the thumbs of shaven-headed yobs occupied instead of forming fists?

Take our poll below and let me know what you think! My dignity depends on it!



Accessories, features, music

Is Baggy/Madchester the next big thing in men’s fashion?

By Stefano on September 12th, 2011

The other day The Guardian’s music/fashion correspondent Alexis Petridis wrote about how men’s fashion has suddenly become massively influenced by one year, 1988 and specifically the time in which 80s fashions (think denim shirts, girlie pumps), collided with the 1950s (think quiffs, Levis 501s, Rayban Wayfarers etc).

This odd combination occurred for a number of serendipitous reasons. Firstly big brands – Levi’s, Southern Comfort among others – began to use 50s imagery and music for their ad camapigns. Secondly a nation of indie kids has become obsessed with Morrissey and in turn with his obsession with James Dean. Suddenly 50s fashions were coming at you from all angles.

So if 1988 is the current apex of cool, where is men’s fashion likely to go next? We have already seen Urban Outfitter’s rather lamentable attempts to hype ‘grunge fashion’ (in some ways that’s an oxymoron) with its Cobain label. But by shifting on to the early 90s men’s fashion would be bypassing one of its most fun, creative and populist periods. I refer of course to Baggy.

For the uninitiated, you are either too young or from North American, Baggy was one of those brief periods in British history (see also late 60s and mid 70s) where the nation’s young let it all hang out. This meant taking copious amounts of a new drug – ecstasy – and listening to oddly psychedelic music – The Stone Roses. The difference this time (compared with the 60s) was that Baggy was dance music-oriented with the dominant soundtrack, in clubs at least, the emerging Acid House sound from Manchester, via Chicago. So a killer combination of dancing and drugs predictably wreaked havoc with the nation’s trouser’s width. The 80s had been largely about skinny jeans morphing into easy fit vintage Levi’s as the decade wore on. Suddenly everyone was wearing Flares.

It wasn’t just trousers either. Baggy ought also to be remembered as the first time the hooded top became a high street fashion staple. Baggy also gave us dayglo sweat shirts, later appropriated by the nu rave crew, as well as Paisley and pattern shirts – which to be fair had been bubbling under for much of the 80s – huge Tees and some fantastic headgear.

Drab old Britain was suddenly a riot of colour and its young cared less about perfecting their quiffs and posing in their vintage shades and more about getting off their tits in fields in Berkshire.

Sadly Baggy didn’t last too long. Internal disagreements (and spiraling drug consumption) tore The Stone Roses and Happy Mondays apart. And as for the Baggy Beatles – the La’s – lead singer Lee Mavers decided that the world only really deserved one album of his genius songs and he went AWOL.

By the time Baggy hit the South (it was mainly a northern thing) the bands were on their way out and the clothes had hit the local charity store. For a few months the UK flirted with some horrendous grunge fashions before Blur, Pulp and Britpop smartened everyone up (a little).

So, Baggy is sure to be revived sooner or later, so now might be as good a time as any to comb your local Oxfam for a nice hooded top with mildly psychedelic patterns on the front. Flares will hopefully be optional this time round.



Accessories, Clothing, Designer Spotlight, Polls

Yay or Nay?- American Apparel Unisex Winter Ski Hood

By Will Reid on November 13th, 2008

aa.jpgAmerican Apparel is a brand that I can’t help but be suspicious of. Yes, the adverts are provocative. Yes, Dov Charney supposedly walks around his office naked. Yes, their shop assistants look like they’ve just walked out of a NYLON spread. My problem is that whenever I see someone wearing American Apparel, it tends to be the case that it is the not the clothes that are great but how they are styled.

I can’t imagine this ‘Winter Ski Hood’ (£10) looking good on anyone who isn’t a model but I am wary of giving it a firm ‘Nay’ as I just know that as soon as this post is published, some edgy fashion editor will decree it the It-item of the season.

What do you think? Vote in our poll!





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