Posts Tagged ‘mick jagger’

Accessories, features, music

Happy Birthday Keith Richards – a tribute (and some cool photos)

By Stefano on December 18th, 2012

Simon Poulter of the always excellent – What Would David Bowie Do? blog on the human riff.

Britain’s Daily Mail, a newspaper you can regard with varying degrees of editorial pointlessness, surmised in June that Keith Richards – the Human Riff, the Human Lab, and a dozen other nicknames reflecting both guitar prowess and indestructibility – was now so broken, so ravaged by arthritic hands and addled memory that he was finding it hard to perform.

Almost in unison, a section of the paper’s permanently seething readership waded in with a barrage of reaction, some berating Keef for even being alive, others suggesting the Rolling Stones had ended their relevance a long time before and should now just give up.

This may go some way to explain why, when the band announced their four 50th anniversary shows, a nuclear mushroom cloud appeared above Middle England as concerned representatives of the Mail’s readership turned apoplectic at news Richards, Jagger, Watts and Wood – with a combined age of 273 – were to roll once more.

Well, today we can make that 274, as Richards chalks up his 69th birthday. It’s an unlikely milestone, even he’ll admit. This apparent freak of nature, who only gave up hard drugs eight years ago, has, for the best part of adulthood, tested human pharmaceutical endurance to its limits while seeing so many contemporaries succumb to rock’s lethal distractions. He is at a loss to explain how he has survived and others didn’t. Perhaps he should just say “pleased to meet you – hope you guessed my name”.

The brilliant autobiography

Much of Richards’ homespun philosophy can be found in his brilliant book Life. A stupendously refreshingly read, Life tells Keef’s story with well managed honesty and little obvious attempt at embellishment, either of the hard truths or the apocryphal tales. It is an engagingly rich story of a boy emerging from London’s bombsite-ridden suburbs to embrace the music of America’s impoverished south, turning such an unlikely affection into the spiritual heart of the most famous – some maintain greatest – rock and roll band of the last 50 years.

That’s an accolade that welcomes challenge: bands have come and bands have gone. “Every generation throws another hero up the pop charts”, sang Paul Simon, and the Stones have faced plenty of competition. They’ve also faced plenty of challenges of their own, not least of which the sibling fractures between Richards and Jagger that have seen them fight, tussle and, seemingly, fall apart irreparably on regular occasions.

Something, however, has always brought them back together again. Richards has always maintained that he and Jagger share a true brotherly love, a bond that occasionally breaks. In his words, Richards has, though, tended to paint Jagger as the more nefarious Glimmer Twin, the posher of the two middle-class Dartford boys, the Stone with the business sense and, now, the knighthood.

Richards, on the other hand, has frequently played up his image as the Stones’ pirate captain, the rock’and’roll rogue: unpredictable and possibly dangerous, like John Belushi’s character Bluto in Animal House, but beneath it all, fundamentally a good guy.

For a while – particularly in the wake of John Lennon’s murder – Richards regularly carried either a knife or a gun, or both. He’s not the Stone to be messed with by any order. Just go to YouTube and find the memorable clip from their 1981 tour, when Keith sees a fan jump on stage and starts charging towards him and Jagger (who deftly takes a swerve), removes his Telecaster by the neck and hacks the fan to the ground before strapping the guitar back on to continue playing. “The cat was in my space,” said Richards, matter-of-factly, “so I chopped the mother down”. That’s why you’ve got to love Keith. Liam Gallagher may have looked like he could do something like that, but you suspect only Keith Richards would.

Immersing myself in Richardsville

Over the last few months I have been immersed in the Rolling Stones. Whatever commercial voodoo they performed around their 50th anniversary has clearly worked. I’ve bought their book and visited the Somerset House exhibition of the book’s photographs; I’ve acquired Blu-ray Discs and DVDs of them in concert in the 70s, 80s and 90s, of them jamming with their great hero Muddy Waters, in the brilliant Stones In Exile documentary, and setting new records on the Bigger Bang tour. And I’ve spent a frustrating 30 minutes attempting to blow what’s left of my life savings on a ticket to one of – any of – their London and New Jersey shows. Somewhere there is a bulldozer with a tongue logo on it shovelling cash into four or five large piles.

While this accumulation will be due in part to Sir Mick Jagger’s assumed stewardship of Rolling Stones Inc. (actually, a Dutch-registered public limited company called Promotone BV which holds its annual company meetings in the curious-to-say-the-least location of Amsterdam), the company’s Chief Riff Officer and CEO Jagger’s fellow Wentworth Primary School, Dartford, alumnus, Richards, might be comfortable with his rewards, but remains at his happiest strumming a blues in an open D tuning.

These last few weeks, the more Stones material I’ve been exposed to, the more I’ve come to appreciate their music, especially its subtlety. That is not a word you associate with the Stones, who’ve often been regarded by music snobs as a Premier League Status Quo for the chugging, thumbs-in-belt-loops-ahoy boogie of Honky Tonk Woman, or the cringeworthy street patois of Miss You, and it’s equally abhorrent disco beat.

But then listen carefully to Sympathy For The Devil, Paint It Black or Gimme Shelter, or some of the live standards like Monkey Man or Tumbling Dice or Midnight Rambler, along with lesser known gems hidden away on their 26-odd studio albums. Why, even more recent fare like Love Is Strong and Doom And Gloom – knocked out in a Paris studio over a couple of days – still deliver the goods as far as Rolling Stones songs go.

You could say that for half their careers, the Rolling Stones have faced calls to quit on the grounds that they’re too old. Keith Richards, at 69, may be today a more avuncular version of his former self, with his clean living and throaty, bronchial laugh (not to mention his parodic turn as Captain Jack Sparrow’s father in the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise – with Johnny Depp happy to admit Sparrow was based on Richards), but he and his ageing band have endured.

That endurance has come from tampering little with the brand: The Beatles started out as rock and rollers before discovering psychedelia and inventing progressive rock; The Who applied a rock edge to Tamla Motown; Led Zeppelin deconstructed and then reconstructed the blues; but the Stones are and have always been the Coca-Cola of rock.

Classic Stones

Sure, like Coke (Classic anyone?) they’ve taken a few ill-advised diversions, but today the Stones remain, pretty much, the same thing enjoyed by each generation that has come across them. Snobs blame this absence of variety on a fairly limited musical spectrum, but much of this is down to Keith. It is, mostly, his songs and riffs that have dictated the Rolling Stones musically.

Richards might have willingly – and at times, to his patent regret – left the running of the band to Jagger, but the spirit of the Stones, the heart and soul of the Stones belongs to him. It was Keith, not Brian Jones who found the triangulation point between the Mississippi Delta, Chicago and London. It was Jagger who then took the concoction and turned it into something more exotic, more 5th Avenue than Dartford High Street, like Levi-Strauss turning workwear into the most enduring fashion item of modern history.

But that’s why we love Keith. If he has pretensions and delusions of grandeur, he keeps them well hidden. He has amassed a fortune, and his properties display copious evidence of his wealth, but unlike the apparent airs and graces of his writing partner, Richards doesn’t overplay the finer things in his life.

To see him on stage today, earnestly toiling away on his collection of Telecasters and other luthiered exotica, is to see a master craftsman at work. He may never be a virtuoso in the manner of a Clapton, a Beck or a Page, but I don’t think he particularly cares. And nor should you. Happy Birthday Keith.

Images PA

Article originally published here.

Mick and Keith - US tour 1975

Picture 1 of 8
Picture 1 of 8



Coats & Jackets

Has Bradley Wiggins made the double breasted suit jacket a style trend for 2013?

By Stefano on December 17th, 2012

Every year at the Oscars fashion houses vie to kit the hottest stars in their latest outfits knowing that the coverage generated by that star can make or break a range.

Conversely the BBC Sports Personality Of The Year event isn’t something that fashion brands are too concerned with, but maybe, just maybe, the suit that the winner was wearing last night might spark a new trend.

Bradley Wiggins looked ultra sharp in a suit with a double breasted jacket that was made in London by tailor Mark Powell. It was also made from velvet, which is a key trend this year. So classically stylish but very contemporary – Wiggins hit the jackpot once again. It is such a refreshing change from footballers kitted out in the latest threads from Italian fashion houses.

So might the Wiggins suit help the double breasted suit jacket become a very hot fashion item in 2012?

Well at the moment if you want one they are pretty hard to come by.

Firstly not all double breasted suit jackets are created equal. There are high collar jackets and low collar jackets. Wiggins last night wore a high collar jacket where the top button and the flap of the collar is high. These have roots in Edwardian clothes and were revived during the mid-60s Mod years – where Wiggins, and another high collar double breasted jacket devotee Paul Weller, get their inspiration.

The lower collar ones have the buttons and the flap around half way down the chest. These were popular in the 70s and 80s and I seem to remember  Jarvis Cocker wearing one in an ironic way in the 90s. They are one 80s item that is unlikely to be revived and in many ways are responsible for killing the double breasted suit jacket off.

If you want a double breasted suit jacket now your choices are fairly limited. You could always do a Bradley and give Mark Powell a call. If you are a bit more limited in your resources and want to buy an off the shelf suit then you don’t have too many options. Specialist 60s store Atom Retro has a few in stock, but that’s about it.

A few words of warning though. They tend to look good on tall, skinny fellas like Wiggins and Weller. If you are short or bigger built then maybe stick to a more conventional two/three collar standard jacket.

Also while they look great with the buttons done up they can, like some  pea coats, look a bit messy with the buttons undone. That’s fine for tired and emotional moments at the end of the evening, but not good for meetings with the boss.

Paul Weller and Paul McCartney

Picture 2 of 7
Picture 2 of 7

(Lef - right) Paul Weller and Sir Paul McCartney backstage at a Teenage Cancer Trust gig at the Royal Albert Hall, London earlier this year, both going double breasted - though Macca's is a bit low for my tatste.



Celeb style, features, Gallery, music

Mick Jagger’s top 10 crimes against fashion (and there are some corkers)

By Stefano on November 26th, 2012

There was a point somewhere in the 1960s when The Rolling Stones were arguably the best dressed band on the planet. They mixed traditional Saville Row threads with flamboyant shirts, cravats and scarves better than anyone. They were the epitome of pop art cool. Check here for evidence.

But then the coolest of the lot of them, Brian, went swimming, Keef got strung out on heroin and Bill grew his hair out. And from a sartorial point of view things went downhill.

Never mind though because there was always Mick. Trouble is that somewhere around 1969 Mick’s style compass completely went AWOL. Probably about the time he wore that white dress in Hyde Park (sadly our pic agency doesn’t have that image!). Throughout the 70s and well into the 80s, he strutted across the stadiums of the world wearing an increasingly bizarre series of onstage costumes. Maybe that’s the point, they were different, daring and bit camp – just like Mick. Sadly like most of the Stones 80s output they looked pretty crap too.

So please don’t get me wrong I really love the Stones and always will, but I still take great pleasure in presenting you with Mick Jagger’s top ten crimes against fashion. Enjoy. I only wish that we could have shared this one with you too.

And if you want to read about some under rated Stones albums go here. Pics copyright PA

Ruffles

Picture 1 of 11
Picture 1 of 11

Frankfurt concert hall, Germany, and to wow the locals Mick donned this little ruffly number in turquoise



Clothing, Entertainment, Heroes and Celebrities, Polls

Yay or Nay?: Ronnie Wood and Girlfriend Go Matching!

By Will Reid on October 27th, 2008

ronnie.jpg

Click Image To Enlarge

Ever since Ronnie Wood ran off with his 18-year old mistress Ekaterina Ivanova, I have been keeping my eye on the new couple’s outfits. Throughout history, scandals have been defined by fashion; Princess Diana’s tiger-print swimsuit, Heather Mills’ patchwork suit, Monica Lewinsky’s ‘Blue Dress.’

It struck me that Ronnie and Ivanova were often wearing outfits with a similar theme. On the left, we can see that one week, they both indulged in tie-dye print and during this week, they wore on-trend plaid/tartan jackets.

What do you think of couples in matching outfits? Yay or Nay?

Take our poll after the jump!

Read the rest of this entry »



Entertainment, Heroes and Celebrities, News

Zoo Magazine: Music Issue 2008- Mick Jagger, Irina Lazareanu, Sean Lennon and Billy Idol

By Will Reid on July 22nd, 2008

zooCoverMick.jpgZoo Magazine has just released its Music issue with a set of four great covers. One sees Irina Lazareanu and Sean Lennon staring wide-eyes and iconic-indie towards the camera. The second cover is just Irina, the third is Mick Jagger with a peek of 64-year old (yet washboard) stomach and the fourth stars Billy Idol.

There are many (loosely) music-related editorials with a mixture of hot, young, glittering stars and a few major musicians such as the previously mentioned Mick Jagger, Billy Idol and also, Wyclef Jean and Sebastian Tellier.

Read on for more pictures and information.

Read the rest of this entry »




©2012 Shiny Digital Privacy Policy
-->