Posts Tagged ‘the Stone Roses’

music

The triumphant return of The Stone Roses at La Cigale in Paris

By Stefano on June 5th, 2013

stone_roses-431x300The Stones Roses play two dates at London’s Finsbury Park this weekend. Simon Poulter got a sneak preview at La Cigale in Paris.

They came from the north, they came from the south. They came for the day by Eurostar, they came for the evening by Metro.

Their hair may have been greying, their kids may have been at home, doing homework under the au pair’s supervision, they may have been squeezed into Adidas tops, they may have been mostly the same nationality, but they were all disciples convening to celebrate the resurrected, if you will, to jog on the spot, primate-style, to one of the greatest British rock bands ever to produce just two albums before disintegrating.

The Stone Roses, for it is they, are on the heritage trail, pure and simple. With no new material to promote (though John Squire has hinted at “three or four” new tracks in the works), this congregation of disciples at La Cigale in Paris is a continuation of what began in 2011 with their unexpected but much savoured reformation.

For a band that collapsed amid catastrophic acrimony following the tour for only their second album, the Roses were greeted in Paris last night as if they’d been going solidly for the last two decades. To be fair, they do perform as if they’ve been going as long.

The music is built around the little-altered formula held together by Mani’s subtly intricate bass work and Remi’s cleverly understated drumming, John Squire’s guitar – a contribution comparable to Johnny Marr’s in The Smiths – and Ian Brown’s mainly flat vocals (some things will never change, it would appear).

In total, it’s an infectious chug that keeps the calf muscles properly exercised for the better part of 90 minutes. And it is wildly appreciated by the 1000-strong crowd, noticeably Anglo-French in its composition, but with a significant bias towards the Brits – local expats and day trippers alike.

The setlist

Fools Gold, I Am The Resurrection, Waterfall, She Bangs, Made of Stone, Adored, Ten Storey Love – like artillery shells on a battlefield they thud into the wildly receptive crowd, one after another, with little fanfare from the band.

Brown’s stage presence is a curious one. Clearly the prototype for Liam Gallagher, albeit without the ridiculous school playground thug demeanour, Brown seems to studiously avoid overstating his role as the band’s lyrical and vocal outlet. When not singing, he’s conducting the crowd with a pair of shakers, as if a sorcerer waving a pair of wands to command even more wild frugging from the floor.

The interaction between bandmates, too, is minimal. Perhaps this is nothing more than the unspoken respect four very old friends have for each other, or the possibility that a fragility remains even now in their relationships after so much discord.

Whatever is keeping it intact is doing so well. In principle it’s rock – with Squire’s numerous flushes of Jimmy Page-like strutting spotlighting how good a rock guitarist he is – and sometimes its just hard-edged dance music.

Whatever it is and whatever it was last night, it was something ragged and perfectly formed at the same time. The Roses may have set the bar high for their generation with the famous Spike Island concert, and their Manchester homecomings last year at Heaton Park reignited the flames of adulation that had licked at the Roses’ boots for the latter 80s and early 90s. Squeezed into the pocket confines of La Cigale, what the Roses lose from not having a tens of thousands massed before them is more than made up for by the 1000 loving every single minute of it.

Article originally published here.



music

Sorted – The Baggy revival is on its way – with Jagwar Ma leading the charge

By Stefano on February 19th, 2013

jagwar ma 2

A year and a half ago I wrote about how if fashion was to stick to a strict chronology then the late 80s fifties influenced styles (Chambray shirts, angular hair cuts etc) that were popular at the time would soon be usurped by the look of 1989 – Baggy.

For the uninitiated – you are probably either too young or North American – Baggy was that brief period in the late 80s and 90s when Ecstasy collided with mind expanding 60s music and gave us a slew of great bands from The Stone Roses though to The Mock Turtles (trust me Turtle Soup is a fine album).

People had mixed psych with beats before – check out this classic 60s Russell Morris track – but Baggy was the perfect synthesis of drug influenced tunes both old and new.

Sadly the Baggy clothes revival hasn’t happened yet – my flares and cricket hats are still primed for action though – but there is more than a hint of a Baggy revival on the music front.

Bizarrely enough it isn’t coming from the north west of England but from Australia and Spain. In many ways it is a sub genre of the psych revival we are seeing at the moment with bands just adding beats to droney swirly 60s style melodies. It is certainly there in the music of bands like Alfa 9, The Moons and The See See.

I guess though Tame Impala got there first and there are several tracks on their Lonerism album, like this, that could have hailed from late 80s Manchester.

But if you want a new Stone Roses check out the two Jagwar Ma (they are from Sydney) singles on Spotify which are both great examples of how fresh and exciting a reinvention of the late 80s might sound.

There’s also this English/Spanish mob – The Chemistry Set – whose 2011 single Impossible Love is influenced by classic 60s psych and dance music.

Also let’s not forget The Stone Roses are touring as are The Three O’Clock (a big influence on the Roses) and The Charlatans’ Tim Burgess has a very fine album out too.

Now if only we could get the members of Flowered Up back together again.

 

 



Accessories, Luggage & Travel

Flaunt your impeccable music taste on the bus with classic album TravelTunes Oyster Card wallets – Manics, My Bloody Valentine, Primal Scream and more!

By Gerald Lynch on September 19th, 2012

My Bloody Valentine - "Loveless" TravelTunes wallet

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Picture 1 of 9

We’ve already lost the ability to promote our reading habits on the bust thanks to coverless-Kindles (maybe for the best if you’re a Fifty Shades fan…), and there’s nothing more obnoxious than blasting out your favourite tunes through a smartphone loudspeaker.

The true gent flaunts his impeccable taste in more subtle ways. When it comes to music, how about these classic album themed Oyster Card/credit card wallets from TravelTunes.

There are nine up for grabs; Kasabian’s “Kasabian“, Leftfield’s “Leftism“, Manic Street Preachers’ “Everything Must Go“, Mark Ronson’s “Version“, My Bloody Valentine’s “Loveless“, Oasis’s “Definitely Maybe“, Primal Scream’s “Screamadelica“, Teenage Fanclub’s “Bandwagonesque” and the first self-titled album from The Stone Roses.

Not only do you get the wallet, but for £5.99 you get a digital download of the associated album to go with it.

To give the collection a look, check out our gallery above, and then click here to order.



features, festivals, music, News

REVIEW: The Stone Roses at Heaton Park – A second coming worth a 16 year wait

By Gerald Lynch on July 2nd, 2012

The Stone Roses - Heaton Park 2012

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Picture 4 of 30

Reunion shows aren’t quite the mystical occasion they once were. From the Pixies to Suede to Led Zeppelin to Pulp, long-missed musical heroes are now a staple head to the line-up of summer festivals.

The Stone Roses reunion, however, sits outside the realms of regular reunion shows . Following an acrimonious split, it’s been 16 years since the original line-up of vocalist Ian Brown, guitarist John Squire, bassist Gary “Mani” Mounfield, and drummer Alan “Reni” Wren shared a stage. With each member taken up with solo projects, other bands or ventures outside of music altogether, bassist Mani called reunion rumours “totally fantasy island”. It seemed like it was never going to happen.

But it did. Though big bucks obviously exchanged hands, this was always going to be about more than just the money. There was unfinished (monkey) business to attend to. Laying down the soundtrack for a generation with their eponymous début album, The Stone Roses took years to put out so-so follow up The Second Coming. From then on in it was a slow slide towards destruction with near misses (such as their heartbreaking headline Glastonbury show pull-out caused, by Squire breaking a collarbone while mountain biking) punctuating the run-up to the band’s inevitable implosion. The band that invented “baggy” and rejuvenated jangly indie pop never got their just deserts.

It was with genuine jubilation then, not cynicism, that fans welcomed the news of a reunion in October 2011.

Saturday’s second Heaton Park homecoming show (30/06/2012) was a triumph, silencing any naysayers and showing a band perfectly at ease with their “legendary” status. If the first night had been methodical and careful, the second saw the band enjoying themselves, playing loose with extended jams and Ian Brown prowling the stage; the King Monkey had reclaimed his throne.

Kicking things off with their traditional slow-building blinder I Wanna Be Adored, The Stone Roses powered through a set of fan favourites which included their first album in its entirety.

Though every song was rapturously received, highlights came in somewhat unexpected places. Fans sang at their loudest during first album track Made Of Stone and The Second Coming single Ten Story Love Song. A well lubricated crowd of all ages was in good, friendly spirits (a rarity in enormo-shows like these), bobbing with baggy swagger to the grooves of Fools Gold, with Squire, Reni and Mani regularly jamming segues between each song.

Though banter was kept to a minimum, Brown kept an eye on a lively crowd, commanding the swarming pit to “pick each other up if you go down”, and flying into an anti-royal diatribe before first album favourite Elizabeth My Dear.

Ending the only way an epic Stone Roses set could with an extended I Am The Resurrection, fans cheered a united, hugging band at the close as fireworks blasted overhead and Bob Marley’s Redemption Song blared out of the PA. A fitting end; after years of fighting and will-they-wont-they reunion rumours, the band have risen phoenix like, redeemed, proving their enduring relevance and position as one of the finest bands to ever hail from British shores.

The set remained identical to Friday night’s opener, and also carried over onto Sunday’s show, likely in order to help director Shane Meadow as he prepares to edit together a commemorative DVD of the weekend. Hit the Spotify playlist below to hear the Saturday night set-list in full:


Earlier in the day saw fellow Manc hero Liam Gallagher declare The Stone Roses “the best band in the world” as he lead his post-Oasis project Beady Eye onstage for the main headline slot. Carrying Gallagher’s trademark swagger throughout, a genial crowd paid most attention when the band tore through a handful of Oasis classics including Rock ‘n’ Roll Star and Morning Glory.

Beady Eye were preceded by Professor Green, whose dubstep-tinged rapping was at odds with the rest of the line-up. Despite a short barrage from hecklers, Professor Green eventually won over the crowds with hits including I Need You Tonight and Just Be Good To Green which saw a surprise appearance from Lily Allen.

The Wailers managed to bring out the sun during what was a heavily overcast day. Though few remaining members of the original Bob Marley-era line-up remain, they enjoyed mass sing alongs to One Love and I Shot The Sheriff.

Hollie Cook, daughter of Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook, kicked off the day with a reggae/punk fused set welcomed by a crowd already fired up by a 16 year wait.

IMAGES – PA



Celeb style, features, Grooming, music

20 Most Iconic Rock ‘n’ Roll Hairstyles

By Gerald Lynch on June 29th, 2012

Rock ‘n’ roll can be broken down as follows: 10% fashion, 10% music and 110% HAIR. We know that adds up to 130%. That’s why we’re writing for a fashion site and aren’t quantum physicists. But it also acts to highlight just how important good hair can be in the making of a musical and cultural icon, and cementing the status of bona-fide rock ‘n’ roll stars. Where would Elvis be without his quiff? Or Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust without his…his unique style? On the dole queue, that’s where. Here, Brandish pick out the 20 most iconic hair styles in rock ‘n’ roll history.

Scroll down to get started!

David Bowie

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Picture 1 of 20

Flaming red with a quiff up top and party mullet at the back, David Bowie's transformation into Ziggy Stardust was one of the most striking in pop history. With the sci-fi influenced Ziggy Stardust look, Bowie opened the floodgates for a whole sea of androgynous stars and, to a lesser extent, made homosexuality and bisexuality less of a rock 'n' roll taboo in the process.



Accessories, features, music

Is Baggy/Madchester the next big thing in men’s fashion?

By Stefano on September 12th, 2011

The other day The Guardian’s music/fashion correspondent Alexis Petridis wrote about how men’s fashion has suddenly become massively influenced by one year, 1988 and specifically the time in which 80s fashions (think denim shirts, girlie pumps), collided with the 1950s (think quiffs, Levis 501s, Rayban Wayfarers etc).

This odd combination occurred for a number of serendipitous reasons. Firstly big brands – Levi’s, Southern Comfort among others – began to use 50s imagery and music for their ad camapigns. Secondly a nation of indie kids has become obsessed with Morrissey and in turn with his obsession with James Dean. Suddenly 50s fashions were coming at you from all angles.

So if 1988 is the current apex of cool, where is men’s fashion likely to go next? We have already seen Urban Outfitter’s rather lamentable attempts to hype ‘grunge fashion’ (in some ways that’s an oxymoron) with its Cobain label. But by shifting on to the early 90s men’s fashion would be bypassing one of its most fun, creative and populist periods. I refer of course to Baggy.

For the uninitiated, you are either too young or from North American, Baggy was one of those brief periods in British history (see also late 60s and mid 70s) where the nation’s young let it all hang out. This meant taking copious amounts of a new drug – ecstasy – and listening to oddly psychedelic music – The Stone Roses. The difference this time (compared with the 60s) was that Baggy was dance music-oriented with the dominant soundtrack, in clubs at least, the emerging Acid House sound from Manchester, via Chicago. So a killer combination of dancing and drugs predictably wreaked havoc with the nation’s trouser’s width. The 80s had been largely about skinny jeans morphing into easy fit vintage Levi’s as the decade wore on. Suddenly everyone was wearing Flares.

It wasn’t just trousers either. Baggy ought also to be remembered as the first time the hooded top became a high street fashion staple. Baggy also gave us dayglo sweat shirts, later appropriated by the nu rave crew, as well as Paisley and pattern shirts – which to be fair had been bubbling under for much of the 80s – huge Tees and some fantastic headgear.

Drab old Britain was suddenly a riot of colour and its young cared less about perfecting their quiffs and posing in their vintage shades and more about getting off their tits in fields in Berkshire.

Sadly Baggy didn’t last too long. Internal disagreements (and spiraling drug consumption) tore The Stone Roses and Happy Mondays apart. And as for the Baggy Beatles – the La’s – lead singer Lee Mavers decided that the world only really deserved one album of his genius songs and he went AWOL.

By the time Baggy hit the South (it was mainly a northern thing) the bands were on their way out and the clothes had hit the local charity store. For a few months the UK flirted with some horrendous grunge fashions before Blur, Pulp and Britpop smartened everyone up (a little).

So, Baggy is sure to be revived sooner or later, so now might be as good a time as any to comb your local Oxfam for a nice hooded top with mildly psychedelic patterns on the front. Flares will hopefully be optional this time round.




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